Category: featured

Drivers of Health

Healthy behavior matters. So are we responsible if we get sick?

This post, by William Gardner, originally appeared on The Incidental Economist. Dr. Gardner is a psychologist. He is the Senior Research Chair in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, and Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Ottawa. He tweets at @Bill_Gardner.

The Price of Food Insecurity

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is considering cutting food stamps for 700,000 Americans, and while this change would supposedly save money in the short run, it could have untold costs in the long run. Research has shown that programs like SNAP and WIC are associated with better health and reduced spending on avoidable hospitalizations. Furthermore,

Housing and Health: What Does the Literature Tell Us?

It is well documented that housing is closely associated with health. The location, condition, and context of where we live intersect many factors that indirectly affect health. Our housing literally encompass environmental (think: dust and exposure to the elements) and social factors (think: isolation and crime) that directly affect health. A person experiencing homelessness would

Education and Health: What Does the Literature Tell Us?

Across many disciplines, greater educational attainment is closely associated with health. People who have obtained more schooling are significantly likelier to live longer, healthier lives. The mediating pathways that facilitate this connection are myriad and complex. A number of pathways have been proposed, including ones involving health literacy and behaviors, employment opportunities, and social and

Getting under the hood of social determinants: Thoughts from the Cambridge meeting

In an illuminating set of conversations on Monday at the Drivers of Health event in Cambridge, a diverse group of experts discussed how health care providers, local policy makers and community groups can work together to provide everyone in society with “a fair and just opportunity to live their healthiest life possible,” as Julie Morita,

Addressing Symptoms and Root Causes

The following is an interview with Kathy Ko Chin, MS, President and CEO of the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum, a national health justice organization which influences policy, mobilizes communities, and strengthens programs and organizations to improve the health of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. She’ll be speaking as a panelist